varicose vein pain reliefVaricose veins are like snowflakes. They are as unique to patients as the treatments are to fix them. Often considered a cosmetic issue, varicose veins are a medical condition called venous insufficiency. And they can be quite painful if not treated. Here’s how to ease the discomfort. 
 

What is Venous Insufficiency?

The cause of venous insufficiency is malfunctioning vein valves. They can’t push blood from the legs back up to your heart, causing the blood to pool in the legs.
Venous insufficiency symptoms often include
  • Heaviness in your legs 
  • Pain/cramping
  • Swelling
  • Restless legs
  • Discoloration

How to Relieve Varicose Vein Pain

If you find yourself in pain from your varicose veins, you should seek treatment with a vein specialist. But here are some options to ease the discomfort at home:
1. Elevate Your Legs. For immediate varicose vein pain relief, elevate your legs above your heart. Place your feet against a table, stretch them up a wall, or lie down in bed and rest your legs on three or four pillows. This helps make it easier for the blood to flow toward the heart. Stay with your legs elevated for at least 15 minutes at a time — that should help reduce the swelling and ease the pain.
2. Exercise and Stretch Your Legs. Flex your feet, especially during long trips when your legroom is limited. If you have to sit or stand all day, change position at least every 30 minutes and your bend knees.
3. Hydrate. Proper hydration supports healthy blood circulation. Drink enough water and move around as often as possible.
4. Use Cold Water. Shower your legs with cold water. Cool temperatures cause blood vessels to shrink, which reduces swelling and feelings of heaviness.
If your varicose vein pain symptoms progress, worsen or don’t go away, see a vein specialist. They can offer a treatment plan based on your symptoms. There are several non-invasive procedures to help ease your pain for good.

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veinsAt Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a FREE virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

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Raynaud's disease causes
What is Raynaud’s Disease?

Raynaud’s disease is a rare condition that affects the arteries. The disorder involves brief episodes of vasospasm, a narrowing of blood flow to the fingers and toes. Symptoms include a numb sensation in response to cold temperatures or stress.

What Causes Raynaud’s Disease?

In Raynaud’s disease, smaller arteries that supply blood to your skin become narrow. Usually, little or no blood flows to affected body parts.

What are the Symptoms of Raynaud’s Disease?

The skin turns white or blue for a short time. As blood flow returns, the affected areas may turn red and throb, tingle, burn, or feel numb.

What Are the Causes of Raynaud’s Disease?

  • Conditions that damage the arteries or nerves that control the arteries in the hands and feet.
  • Repetitive actions that damage the nerves controlling the arteries in the hands and feet.
  • Injuries to the hands and feet.
  • Exposure to certain chemicals.
  • Medicines that narrow the arteries or affect blood pressure.
  • Mild or brief changes in temperature.
  • Women are more likely than men to have Raynaud’s disease.

Is There Treatment for Raynaud’s Disease?

Most people who have primary Raynaud’s can manage the condition with lifestyle changes. Those who have more severe Raynaud’s may need medicine and lifestyle changes.

Lifestyle Changes: Lifestyle changes can help you avoid things that may trigger a Raynaud’s attack. Examples of such triggers include cold temperatures, emotional stress, workplace or recreational factors, and contact with certain chemicals or medicines.

Protect Yourself From Cold Temperatures: Wear a hat, mittens (rather than gloves), scarf, coat with snug cuffs, and warm socks and shoes during cold weather. Put hand and foot warmers in your gloves, boots, socks, or pockets. Avoid Other Stress Triggers Try to avoid things that make you upset or stressed. Learn ways to handle the stress that you can’t avoid. Physical activity helps some people cope with stress. Other people listen to music or practice yoga.

Avoid Workplace and Recreational Triggers: For example, limit the use of vibrating tools, such as drills. Wear proper protective gear if you work with industrial chemicals. Also, try to limit repetitive hand actions, such as typing or playing the piano.

Medicines that can Trigger Raynaud’s:

  • Migraine headache medicines that contain ergotamine. This substance causes your arteries to narrow.
  • Certain cancer medicines, such as cisplatin and vinblastine.
  • Over-the-counter cold or allergy medicines or diet aids. Some of these medicines can narrow your arteries.
  • Beta-blockers slow your heart rate and lower your blood pressure.
  • Birth control pills can affect blood flow.

Medication for Raynaud’s

If lifestyle changes don’t control Raynaud’s, you may need medicines to improve blood flow. Some include calcium channel blockers, alpha-blockers, and skin creams.

 

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veinsAt Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a FREE virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

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bulging veins on hands
Our blood moves throughout the body via blood vessels. Sometimes they’ll appear as bulging or popping veins in the hands and feet. These swollen veins can look weird and show off our age. The good news is most bulging veins aren’t really a sign of poor health. But there are instances where they may arise from a serious vascular disease. Either way, we’ll go over what you need to know about bulging veins.

What Causes Bulging Veins in the Hands and Feet?

Aging: As we age, our skin gets thinner and less elastic, making our blood vessels more visible. Your vein valves weaken, which can cause blood to pool in your veins for a longer period of time. This enlarges the vein. It’s all a normal process of getting older.

Genetics: Having family members with bulging veins increases your chances of getting them.

Hot Weather: Heat can make veins more prominent and enlarged. Hot temperatures also make it harder for veins to function properly. They’ll work harder and become more visible.

Hormone Imbalance: Pregnancy or menopause can lead to a hormone imbalance. One of the symptoms is bulging veins. Pregnancy may also put pressure on veins, making it harder for blood flow to get back to the heart.

Exercise: Bulging veins is common in those who do a lot of strength training exercises. Heavy lifting for long periods of time makes the blood flow increase. The muscles harden, causing more visible blood vessels. Over-stretching also plays a major role in making veins pop out.

Thrombophlebitis: Blood clots in the vein can cause it to bulge. These blood clots often form in the leg and can break off. They’ll flow to the lung and cause a condition called pulmonary embolism.

Body Fat Loss: Our skin has a layer of fat that serves as an insulator. When you lose weight, that layer thins and leads and makes veins more visible.

Health Conditions: Underlying heart problems can cause a chronic increase in blood pressure. This weakens the veins and can cause popping.

How to Fix Bulging Veins

Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs can help decrease the swelling of bulging veins. Eating healthy foods with high water content can also help ease vein pressure. There are also procedures that can help remove veins that pop out.

Sclerotherapy injects a chemical solution into targeted veins and makes them close.

Ambulatory phlebectomy is the removal of the targeted veins via small incisions. Vein stripping and ligation close the vein that supplies blood to the targeted vein. While you’re under general anesthesia, your doctor will make an incision, tie off the vein, and remove it. The blood that used to run in the vein is automatically shifted. The closed vein eventually fades away.

Cosmetic or Medical, Bulging Veins Can be Fixed

Bulging hand and feet veins aren’t a serious medical issue for the majority of people. But if you’re concerned that your popping veins are something serious — or you don’t like the way they look — make an appointment with a vein doctor.

If there’s a serious problem, they can recommend treatment. If you want them removed for cosmetic purposes, your doctor will have a suggestion on the best procedure for you. In the unlikely event, your bulging hand and feet veins are a sign of a more serious condition, your doctor will offer specific medical treatment.

 

 

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veinsAt Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a FREE virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

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how cold weather affects varicose veins
If you have varicose veins, spider veins, or other forms of venous disease, colder seasons can take a toll on your legs
. Here we’ll look at what happens to your veins in colder temperatures and how it affects your veins’ overall function. 

Positive Effects of Cold Weather on Your Veins

Less Discomfort​: Cold temperatures can actually cause your veins to shrink. This makes it easier for the vein valves to function and decrease the pressure around the ankles and calves. As a result, this could mean fewer cramps and swollen ankles!

Negative Effects of Cold Weather on Your Veins

Circulatory Problems: When the temperatures drop enough for it to snow, the atmospheric pressure changes. This can cause your circulatory system to become less efficient, which can aggravate vein problems.
 
Weight Gain​: It’s common during the holiday months to gain a few extra pounds. That means your legs are under more stress to pump blood back to your heart. Despite the cold weather, try to stay active. This will keep the valves pumping blood through the veins.

How to Maintain Vein Health in Winter

Here are a few ways to keep the symptoms of varicose veins in check during the colder months:
  • Elevate your legs for 30 minutes before you go to sleep.
  • Eat high-fiber foods like avocados, beans, and berries for good circulation.
  • Try some light stretching in the morning, at midday, and before bed.
  • Massage your ankles and lower legs when possible.

See a Vein Specialist

There are many things you can do to address the current symptoms of varicose veins and prevent future varicose veins from forming. But, once a vein has become varicose, it’s impossible to treat without medical attention. Seeking a vein specialist is recommended to address your vein issues.

 

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veinsAt Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a FREE virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

Filed under: Vein HealthTagged with: ,

venous insufficiency CEAP stagesVenous Disease is Complex But Can Be Described

So how does your vein doctor know the severity of your varicose veins? We use the Comprehensive Classification System for Chronic Venous Disorders (CEAP). And you can use it too!

Before CEAP, there wasn’t a method for healthcare professionals to classify vein disease. Instead, they would describe symptoms and rate them as mild, moderate, or severe. The approach wasn’t helpful and lacked specificity. Communication was often lacking between providers.

What the CEAP Acronym Stands For

C = clinical condition 

E = etiology

A = anatomic location 

P = pathophysiology

What is CEAP Classification?

The American Venous Forum wrote the first CEAP classification in 1994. It provides a comprehensive classification that’s accepted worldwide. Most published medical papers now use all or portions of the CEAP system. It has two parts: classification and severity scoring of lower extremity vein disease. CEAP classification ranges from C0 (no venous disease) to C6 (an open and active ulcer).

Today, all healthcare professionals use the CEAP system when describing vein disease. It’s designed to be very specific. In short, it offers everything that the previous system failed to do.

The 7 Stages of the CEAP Classification System

C0: A functioning, healthy venous system. Leg veins pulse blood back towards the heart exactly as they’re supposed to.

Severity: mild

C1: Presence of spider veins, reticular veins, or telangiectasia. By themselves, spider veins are nothing more than a cosmetic nuisance. But they do point out some level of reflux in the larger veins of the legs. They’re a direct precursor to varicose veins.

Severity: mild

C2: The formation of varicose veins. Patients begin to experience symptoms like achy legs, swelling, and cramping. This leads to increased pressure, which in turn causes surface veins to swell. Over time, they become stretched out and become varicose veins. Without treatment, it’s likely the condition with progress to the following stage.

Severity: moderate

C3: The presence of edema, a medical term for fluid retention and swelling. Compression stockings and edema pumps can manage symptoms. But treatment will help the underlying condition. A patient’s vein disease will worsen if not treated.

Severity: moderate to severe

C4: Visible skin changes. Fluid retention leads to changes in the color, texture, and appearance of the skin. The presence of eczema and brownish, purplish, or reddish blotches is common.

Severity: severe

C5: Painful ankle ulcers around the ankles that heal on their own. Chronic fluid retention will cause increased blood pressure within the leg veins. This can lead to an impaired circulation which can cause a breakdown of the overlying skin.

Severity: severe

C6: Lower extremity ulcers that don’t heal. About 1% of patients with vein disease will progress to CEAP stage 6. As the condition worsens ulcers won’t heal without specialty wound care. At this point, treatment is medically necessary. 

How Can I Classify Myself with CEAP?

Most people with varicose veins know they have bulging veins in their legs. The CEAP system will help them understand the severity of the varicose vein problem and seek the right treatment.

But when using CEAP, remember that it’s external observations of underlying health issues. A venous ultrasound scan can examine all the veins underneath. Without it, there is no full diagnosis.

 

 

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veins

At Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a FREE virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

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Internal versus external varicose vein ruptureWhile varicose veins cause aching pain and discomfort, they can sometimes lead to more serious problems and can even burst, especially when left untreated. This is a critical time to seek medical help and finally get treatment for your varicose veins, because if a vein pops once, it may happen again.

Here, we explain why varicose veins burst and the next steps to take for a safe and healthy recovery.

What Makes a Varicose Vein Burst?

A varicose vein can burst from increased pressures within the veins. This build-up of pressure causes the walls of the vein to stretch, making it weak and prone to sudden rupture. A ruptured varicose vein can bleed into tissues and through the skin’s surface, especially if the skin is thin.

What Are the Symptoms of a Burst Varicose Vein?

Internal Symptoms

If a varicose vein ruptures, but the skin is not broken, symptoms including bruising, dizziness, or fainting. If you experience these symptoms, visit your vein care specialist or nearest emergency room to avoid excessive blood loss and other complications.

External Symptom

If a varicose vein ruptures and the skin is broken, significant bleeding will occur. Because veins burst from excess pressure, the bleeding can be rapid and profuse. In this case, call 911 and seek medical attention immediately to prevent excessive blood loss.

What Should I Do After my Varicose Vein Bursts?

If a varicose vein has burst, elevate the leg of the affect area on a stack of pillows or up a wall. This will help reduce swelling and blood loss. Next, apply pressure on the bleeding site with a towel or cotton t-shirt. This will help slow or stop the bleeding while you seek medical attention.

To avoid excessive blood loss, visit your vein care specialist or the nearest emergency room as soon as possible. Medical treatment of ruptured varicose veins involves an ultrasound guided sclerotherapy. Patients need to undergo complete evaluation of the lower extremity veins to check for underlying cause of the rupture. We encourage you to seek treatment accordingly to prevent future ruptures.

leaf character sitting and elevating his leg after a ruptured varicose vein

How Can I Prevent a Varicose Vein from Bursting?

The best way to prevent a varicose vein from bursting is to get vein treatment. Not only does treating varicose veins and venous insufficiency help with your overall health, it can also help you avoid some serious potential long-term risks like a ruptured vein or a leg ulcer.

Treat Your Varicose Veins Today

If you, or a loved one suffers with leg swelling, rashes, or ulcers, see a vein specialist as soon as you can to prevent a potential vein rupture. If you don’t have symptoms but do have the risk factors for varicose veins, see a doctor. A simple ultrasound test will determine whether you have varicose veins or not. 

Remember, untreated varicose veins can lead to serious health problems. Don’t wait. With your varicose veins treated, you’ll feel better — and you’ll live a longer, healthier life with fewer complications.

 

Delaware State riding a bicycle to healthier veins

At Delaware Advanced Vein Center, our medical staff has years of experience helping people with their spider and varicose veins. We would love to welcome you to our family of satisfied patients. 

Contact us today to schedule a free virtual consultation and vein evaluation.

Filed under: Varicose VeinsTagged with: ,